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WebDirections event – interface design and ethnographic research


The lovely Maxine Sherrin from westciv sent me this:

Interface design, and the use of ethnographic research in designing for the web: announcing our second free Sydney event for 2006.
On August 31 we’ve got a diverse evening, with Emily Boyd of Remember the Milk speaking about the development of this very successful Australian web app, along with Stephen Cox of Intuity, who’ll be talking us through the use of ethnographic research in the process of innovation and design.
http://www.webdirections.org/2006/08/08/aug-31-event/
Emily Boyd: Lessons learned from designing the interface of Remember The Milk
Emily will talk about creating rich AJAX interfaces for web-based applications, and her experiences designing popular task management web app Remember The Milk. Learn about the challenges of designing web interfaces that are simple yet powerful, and see concrete examples of ways that AJAX can be used to enhance the user experience.
Emily is an interface designer and developer. As well as Remember the Milk, she is also the founder of MatMice, a website which has been used by more than one million children worldwide to create their own web pages.
Stephen Cox: Corporate ethnography, what the hell is it and why would you care?Stephen Cox looks at some of the ways he approaches ethnography in the corporate environment (with corporate timeframes) and how it helps in design, decision making and customer experience. Learn all about this fascinating approach to design research, which will be further examined by Kelly Goto at Web Directions in September.Stephen started his working life as a pre-historian and anthropologist, making the move into web design in 1996 and later working in user-centred design for The Hiser Group. Stephen has since established his own consultancy, Intuity, and has now worked his way through two years of research into modern culture and the needs of users, with a particular focus on how interpretations of culture can help aid in the process of innovation and design.
If you work with the web, you’ll be enthused, inspired, and informed by these knowledgeable and entertaining speakers. It’s also a great opportunity to meet other interesting and talented people who work in your industry.
Web Directions will be providing finger food for the night, and there’ll be a cash bar if you feel like a drink.
Most importantly, you’ll also have the chance to win a ticket to the Web Directions Conference later this year in Sydney, valued at $850, as well as places at our exclusive breakfast with web guru Molly Holzschlag.
Best of all, the event is free, but places are limited, so please RSVP to info@webdirections.org.

Details
What: Web Directions presents Emily Boyd of RTM and Stephen Cox of Intuity
When: 6.00pm for 6.30pm Thursday August 31 2006
Where: Hotel CBD, Jam Bar, Level 4, 52 King Street, SydneyMap: http://www.webdirections.org/2006/08/08/aug-31-event/
Cost: Free, but please RSVP info@webdirections.org

Hotel CBD should give me a loyalty discount card *rolls eyes*

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Laurel Papworth

Named by Forbes™ Magazine in the Top 50 Social Media Influencers globally, named Head of Industry, Social Media (Marketing Magazine™) and in the Power150 Media bloggers (AdAge™). CERT IV Training and Assessment certified trainer (Diplomas and Certificates etc) Adult Education. Laurel has manager Facebook Pages for Junior Masterchef, Idol, Big Brother etc. and have consulted on private online communities for banks Westpac, not for profits UNHCR & governments in SE Asia. Lecturer, social media, University of Sydney for 10 years and Laurel has 11,000 online students. Laurel Papworth personally connects to 6 million followers online and has taught around 100,000 people in the last 10 years how to be social media managers.

One thought on “WebDirections event – interface design and ethnographic research

  1. Just wondering if there is any more recent information on WebDirections event – interface design and ethnographic Research as discussed in Maxine Sherrin’s material from August 2006?

    thanks
    Mark Drolc

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