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Laurel Papworth

Named by Forbes™ Magazine in the Top 50 Social Media Influencers globally, named Head of Industry, Social Media (Marketing Magazine™) and in the Power150 Media bloggers (AdAge™). CERT IV Training and Assessment certified trainer (Diplomas and Certificates etc) Adult Education. Laurel has manager Facebook Pages for Junior Masterchef, Idol, Big Brother etc. and have consulted on private online communities for banks Westpac, not for profits UNHCR & governments in SE Asia. Lecturer, social media, University of Sydney for 10 years and Laurel has 11,000 online students. Laurel Papworth personally connects to 6 million followers online and has taught around 100,000 people in the last 10 years how to be social media managers.

8 thoughts on “Facebook in Australia

  1. First hand experience from my time at ninemsn would suggest this is going to be a tough sell.
    ninemsn were responsible for leaderboard banner ad sales – not the integrated adboard placements (which are self serving).
    Whilst there are a huge amount of impressions, the CTR’s are almost non existent.
    Clearly not the right environment for broadcast banner ads!
    I can’t wait to see the integration opportunities that hit the market.

  2. Here’s hoping some decent customer service comes with that!! Am over the ‘Facebook is aware of the issue’ standard response.

  3. @Tony I’m totally mesmerised by Facebook Social Ads – put in girls, 19 -21 years, Location: Brisbane and Britney Spears in keywords – Facebook delivers live data of number of teen girls with Britney in their profile/music list. The killer of Google contextual ads MUST be social profile ads?

    @Angelin – learn how to spam links properly. Plus it’s now (as of last week) 100 million REGULAR members (log in once a week. or is it a month?)

    @Danielle – I contacted Facebook, explained your concerns and they said … “Facebook is aware of the issue” – hope this helps 😛

  4. Facebook offers ok targeting but inappropriate context most of the time.

    And it’s the same problem most of the myspace, Digg, LinkedIn, Slide’s etc of the world face – lots of eyeballs, interesting ways to cut the data to make them seem interesting and appealing, but the context is rarely right so the placements are generally ineffective in the scheme of the wider comms mix.

    Facebook’s plan is to rid online advertising of the need to have an external destination – ie ‘click away’ from the page. The opportunities I have seen are based on ‘in ad’ executions where you can interact with a brand, trailer, music etc without leaving the page. I don’t mind the thinking but it’s only really scratching the surface.

    This is interesting, as Google Content Network will not accept ads without a click url, which indirectly is a statement (imo) that Google feel that if you can’t click on an ad it has no worth.

    I think over the next 18 months there will be closer inspection on these types of sites and their ability to monetise through advertising – maybe we’ll have to accept some of them just aren’t very good places to place ads … just becasue you have an audience doesn’t entitle you to build a business putting ads in front of that audience.

  5. I agree with Ben Shepard’s point the ‘in ad’ executions have been limited to date.

    If I recall correctly, it is Gartner research that indicated the ‘lack of value to the customer’ is the main reason why social media marketing fails.

    To float an idea, perhaps business needs to move away from the attitude ‘it’s the customers privilege to download my branded [insert viral video or widget here]’.

    At risk of stating the obvious, I don’t understand why more corporations aim higher to find tools that increase community interactivity and offer greater customer value?

    It’s not easy finding the right mix. Corporations need to take on the attitude participating in social media is a constant learning experience.

    Mike Hickinbotham
    Telstra blogger
    http://www.nowwearetalking.com.au/blogs/the-scrum

  6. Ayep – Myspace makes $2.17 per year per member. 99% Advertising.
    Cyworld (similar size, but in Asia) makes around $17 per year. And ZERO advertising.

    Makes ya think.

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