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Australian Financial Review and Archaic Constructs


Well, I really wanted to showoff to you just a snippet of an article from the Australian Financial Review today (written by Renai LeMay), where I am quoted on the MySpace vs Facebook social networking debate. But when I try to copy and paste, this is what I get:

y p c A s r l a a y s e d y o c d o e e d t c a m o e u t a i ‘s o t o u a s c a n t o k n w b i e o l w n t e e e s o s r e d t s o i g a e o k a s o e t e e d.

It’s to make sure you HAVE to go to the AFR.com site to read the articles and makes sure us naughty bloggers don’t get our grubby little hands on them.

Me, nicking my own words back off AFR site.

As John Gilmore said (and is oft-quoted)

“The Net interprets censorship as damage and routes around it.”

Now far be it from me to incite a revolution but can’t one of my clever clogs readers create a proxy site that translates the text back again? Like Babelfish or Google Translate?

I think the AFR’s issue is about something called – and forgive me, my grasp of Ancient History and Archaic Languages is not good – intellectualio propertium. Or something similar from the Medieval period. Heh.

Echo: Renai … Renai … leave the dark side and come to the light… the light … the light

Darnit, I was so happy to be in the AFR but they keep breaking my little blogging heart. Remember Australian Media: Just STOP it? *sniffles* If bloggers can’t quote a snippet, they won’t blog therefore they won’t link, therefore no Google Juice. It just doesn’t work the way you think it does, Mainstream Media! This is not directed at Renai unless he personally set the strategy for the AFR site. Which I doubt, cos he seemed really quite reasonable for an ink-stained reprobate journo.

EDIT: I can’t believe I missed this: Gary Barber pointed out that encrypting the text is not accessibility-friendly. So did the Twitterati – @ericsheid et al. They are chatting up a storm about court cases and such. Methinks we will hear more about this soon…

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Laurel Papworth

Named by Forbes™ Magazine in the Top 50 Social Media Influencers globally, named Head of Industry, Social Media (Marketing Magazine™) and in the Power150 Media bloggers (AdAge™). CERT IV Training and Assessment certified trainer (Diplomas and Certificates etc) Adult Education. Laurel has manager Facebook Pages for Junior Masterchef, Idol, Big Brother etc. and have consulted on private online communities for banks Westpac, not for profits UNHCR & governments in SE Asia. Lecturer, social media, University of Sydney for 10 years and Laurel has 11,000 online students. Laurel Papworth personally connects to 6 million followers online and has taught around 100,000 people in the last 10 years how to be social media managers.

6 thoughts on “Australian Financial Review and Archaic Constructs

  1. Please consider the Children…
    and the people using mobile devices and screen readers.. This is a accessibility case just waiting to happen!

  2. Hi Lauren,
    Often stories from the print version of the AFR end up online at the Fin’s ‘sister’ site for MIS magazine.
    (http://www.misaustralia.com/)

    I assume that’s so they can keep their print ‘exclusivity’ on stories in the print edition of the ARF while still putting the copy online. Their web strategy isn’t transparent to me at this time. 🙂

    Might not help with the particular story you mentioned, but it’s an interesting data point nonetheless

  3. Actually within 20 mins of my whinging, a TwitFriend put up a deobfuscator – I can put in any AFR URL now and get a copyable transcript 🙂
    … bless his little copyright thievin’ socks 🙂

  4. Don’t underestimate the Google Juice – it’s powerful stuff! Slightly off-topic but a good example; I recently got screwed on a warranty claim for $1,200 in car repairs because the particularly component was not specifically included in the contract (clearly not, because to explicitly list everything would be absurd). So I posted the rejection letter on flickr.

    Within 24 hours I was (and still am) the leading result on Google for a search of the warranty company’s name.

    But obviously we’d prefer to be directing the Google Juice for good – so don’t inhibit us! You can only benefit!

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