Some random stuff:

Thanks TechCrunch!

Then Australian Internet Usage (mentioned before, announced at ad:tech sydney):

AUSSIE INTERNET USAGE OVERTAKES TV VIEWING FOR THE FIRST TIME
– Australian consumers approaching point of media ‘saturation’
– Aussies clocking up over 84 hours per week in media usage Sydney, 18 March 2008
— The amount of time Australians are spending online has, for the first time ever, surpassed the amount of time spent watching television, according to a report released today by Internet measurement company, Nielsen Online. The study found that Australians were spending around 13.7 hours per week surfing the ‘net, while average television viewing was around 13.3 hours per week. (See chart 1).
These and other results were released today as part of Nielsen Online’s 10th Australian Internet and Technology Report which looks at the profile of Internet users, online behaviours, ownership of technologies and media consumption habits.

and last but not least – McKinsey Quarterly are catching on:

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I think – after what? 20 years? more? – we’ve arrived.