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Laurel Papworth

Named by Forbes™ Magazine in the Top 50 Social Media Influencers globally, named Head of Industry, Social Media (Marketing Magazine™) and in the Power150 Media bloggers (AdAge™). CERT IV Training and Assessment certified trainer (Diplomas and Certificates etc) Adult Education. Laurel has manager Facebook Pages for Junior Masterchef, Idol, Big Brother etc. and have consulted on private online communities for banks Westpac, not for profits UNHCR & governments in SE Asia. Lecturer, social media, University of Sydney for 10 years and Laurel has 11,000 online students. Laurel Papworth personally connects to 6 million followers online and has taught around 100,000 people in the last 10 years how to be social media managers.

31 thoughts on “Australia: Bans, Filters and Government 2.0 Taskforce

  1. Laurel
    Ministers Office
    “under the filtering plan, it will be extended to downloadable games, flash-based web games and sites which sell physical copies of games that do not meet the MA15+ standard”

    Linden Lab has done (and as far as I know still does) restricted all but over 18’s on the main grid… it is by their own definition restricted to over 18s, and hence the equivalent of a R rating (if it existed for games)

    That it has yet been classified by ACMA is chicken and egg stuff…and indeed you’re right in some degree when you say this “government has said in the past that multiplayer games are inherently unclassifiable”….if it can’t be classified (which it can’t) then it’s RC. Given there’s no over 18’s classification for games, it’s a given that it gets RC.

    Laurel, I want to be wrong here, I really do, but the minister has made it very clear now.
    .-= Duncan Riley´s last blog ..Actress Gale Storm dies at 87 =-.

    1. hmmm “boxed” games can be downloaded from those premium server sites. Maybe that’s what s/he meant? I wish s/he had said “muiltiplayer games” or “social collaboration games” to make it clear. Otherwise it might just be GTA (Grand Theft Auto) downloaded (not a bought box) which, as far as we have already accepted the status quo, is acceptable.

      Duncan, if they ban Second Life and World of Warcraft, they have to ban user generated worlds too. And games. Which means MySpace apps and Facebook Whats Your Stripper Name and that stupid iPhone one where you turn the phone upside down and the girls are undressing (like naughty pens). Do we really want everyone in the world who can drag and drop some java modules submitting apps for classification? iTunes could probably handle it, but the other sites? nah. Not scaleable by a government department, especially if not harnessing the collaborative metaGov stuff.

      It has to stop somewhere – otherwise classifying TV and film will start to be classifying every YouTube video. And we’ve seen how the government handles that (they ban the whole site, including Harvard, MIT and Stanford Lecture series). Again, not scaleable.

      Filter Second Life, World of Warcraft, – filter everything or risk being sued for unfair practices. Filter everything and we grind to a halt. Or maybe that’s the point…

          1. http://www.personalizemedia.com/when-a-virtual-world-glitch-rocks-real-world-parliament-the-power-of-ripples/ is the link – a completely beat up job, Stephen Conroy was perpetrating a fake situation in May 21 2007.

  2. A small point, about 25% of those “inherently unclassifiable games” have been classified by the Australian Classifications Board. The remainder were never submitted on some understanding that classification was “not required”

    Even the CB has admitted in an offical, cleared statement that it would not have, and could not have classified the ones that it did if the games were not classifiable games under the Classifications Act.

    1. Yeah I don’t have a link to the cleared statement – do you? please send? 😛 – but “Ron” from the department told the Ausgamer guy in a telephone call “Ron let me know that World of Warcraft was not rated by the OFLC – in fact, was never even submitted for classification – it was a “waste of time” as the game is exclusively online, exclusively multiplayer, and has no defined start and end. Thus it is inherently unclassifiable. ”
      I think YouTube videos also falls in the “Should Be in TV/Film/Broadcast Public Audience Category But Too Hard Basket”, no?

      1. I got the statements from them by email when I was researching for several articles earlier this year.

        http://www.massively.com/2009/01/28/mmogs-defy-classification-in-australia/

        http://www.massively.com/2009/02/04/gaming-the-ratings-game/

        http://www.massively.com/2009/02/06/australia-takes-no-action-on-unrated-computer-games/

        http://www.massively.com/2009/02/20/aus-government-confused-on-mmog-ratings-requirements/

        By the end there, they were starting to contradict themselves, and then completely refused to respond. I still have their statements tucked away in my email somewhere.

      2. Oh, while I remember – they don’t go by the OFLC name anymore. They dropped that back in 2007, when they merged with the Federal Attorney General’s office. They’re just the CB nowadays.

        1. Yes, it was annoying they changed their name – old links don’t work and their current search engine is frankly b0rked. I had to use Google domain search to find anything on their site. But thanks for your comments 😛

  3. ha ha the internetz is dead to Australians, shame the pollies haven’t worked out that even the most brain dead internet user can get around their filters.

    Time for a “Pirate Party”/”EFF” style political membership organisation for the Australian federal givernment so that over tea and crumpets someone of their stature can take them to one side and point out they are living in a fairy land.

    My recommendation is start a non taxable charity and run on this platform “Laurel Papworth for Presidentz of the Internetz”.

    Cheers,
    Dean Collins
    www.Cognation.net

  4. Australian government looking to ban World of Warcraft, and other online games. Maybe even Steam and Second Life? http://twurl.nl/3aisd5

  5. RT @SilkCharm Australia: Bans, Filters and Government 2.0 Taskforce | Laurel Papworth- Social Network Strategy http://tinyurl.com/lnddd3

  6. I think its totally unfair to remove a internet recreation activity such as Second Life and WOW. There are far more internet websites that promote child abuse than secondlife. Why should people that spend their
    recreational dollars on meeting people from all over the world in an interactive way such as SL. You would be much fairer if there was a gateway link that needed to be age verified for adults to access second
    life. What ever happened to democracy in our Country? When did politicians stop listening to the little people, especially those with a disability that use SL as their only social outlet. This Game is not all
    about sex, some of us build and run clubs to enjoy music from all over the world. For some people this is all they have, dont punish the minority. Think hard why you became a politition and who helped you get
    there!

    I’m a Graduated helper in Secondlife and I spend time to help newbies and I don’t see any proof of child pornography and anything else really. Why would Stephen Conroy take away Adult Leisure and left nothing for us to enjoy. I think he’s is morally wrong for pointing secondlife as Game as it is not a game but it is 3d Virtual 3d Social networking. I made friends on it and if cut off there no way I can contact them. Also
    Facebook is stay and so is Secondlife is stay.

    I have hearing disabilities and low esteem and don’t have many friends in RL and this is only way of my communication to keep me going.

    Australia is freedom country and this is not China!!!!

    Please stop this happening.

  7. The filtering legislation is being introduced tomorrow (Tuesday, 2 February). Last I looked, supporters of the (as yet unseen) legislation numbered exactly enough for it to pass. I imagine that unless something surprising happens that it will pass quickly.

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